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Haiti

Haiti has a long history of underdevelopment and political instability. Haiti is beset by widespread poverty, economic decline, violence, food scarcity, poor education, unemployment, poor governance, and severe violence. Haiti is in desperate need of economic improvement.

Haiti is a small island (it actually shares an island with the Dominican Republic) and with a surface area of just 27,797 square kilometers (km2), Haiti is second only to Barbados as the most densely populated country (306 people per km2) in the Americas.  Currently, there are 9 million people living in Haiti.

Here are some staggering facts about the situation in Haiti:

  • 42% of children less than five years of age suffer from stunting of growth.
  • Literacy rates in Haiti for the general population were 45% in 2010.
  • Unemployment is now 90% in Haiti and 80% of Haiti’s people live in abject poverty.
  • There are over 400,000 children without parents in Haiti.
  • 1 out of 5 children will die before the age of five.
  • Haiti has the highest maternal death ratio in the western hemisphere leaving many children orphaned within their first week of life.
  • More than 80% do not have access to clean drinking water.
  • In rural areas only 10 percent of the inhabitants have electricity
  • Haiti is ranked 149th out of 177 on the 2009 United Nations Human Development Index.
  • The World Food Program reports that food supply covers only 55% of the population.
  • Haiti ranks among the worst three countries in the world in daily caloric intake per person.
  • More than 80% do not have access to clean drinking water.
  • In rural areas only 10 percent of the inhabitants have electricity

Chances for Children was formed specifically to focus on helping to improve lives for the children of Haiti. Haiti needs help to get it’s country back to stability. The future of the country rests in the hands of it’s current and future leaders. It is our belief that by focusing on the children of Haiti, its future leaders, we can begin to pave the way to solvency.

statistics provided by World Bank  Report 36060-HT